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Why It Works
 

A Busy Day reading approach is based on the needs of those who find the process of reading difficult. It's foundations are based on the school curriculum. For children it is important to provide the basic fundamentals for early literacy skills. This involves introducing our children to pre-reading, writing and communication skills.

A Busy Day is based primarily on whole word sight recognition and incorporates all the foundations of reading. However it goes further by allowing the struggling reader a means to interpret symbols in a simple but visual way.


Boy reading a book

PROBLEMS WITH READING AND COMMUNICATION

When the average child begins the reading process he has usually mastered the art of oral communication. He can speak and understand his own language in a fairly complex way employing units of language organised in a hierarchy and with grammatical structure.

Communication is a complex process, which involves the exchange of information between two or more people. Effective communication ranges from spoken word, to gestures, to pictures, objects and symbols. To be effective, communication also requires understanding of social codes, if not confusion arises.

However some children within the Autistic Spectrum (ASD) and Downs Syndrome are severely hampered by their communication skills and because of this the Busy Day reading approach was created. 
Using the faculties of sight, sound, speech and fine motor skills we relate pictures, written words and the spoken word in a structured approach. Children gain a deeper understanding of language and its purpose through success. Their communication, comprehension, confidence and self esteem improve noticeably.

A Busy Day adapts to the needs of the individual, especially for those children who acquire knowledge by relying primarily on their visual strengths, as everything in this package can be tailored to the pupil’s needs.

 

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